Sometimes the lessons we need the most come to us from strange places.

While I was getting dressed this morning, my just turned five year old daughter Kate came bouncing up to me with a rubber band.

“Put this on your wrist, daddy”

This was kind of a strange request so I asked her why and she told me that I need to put it on my wrist and snap it every time I say the word LIKE.

 

I laughed really hard and asked her where she heard this piece of advice and she told me she picked it up from Scooby Doo.

It seems that Shaggy that consummate millennial, has a real problem with his filler words. He uses the word like as if it were a comma. To help him deal with this distracting issue, Thelma suggested that he wear a rubber band on his wrist and snap it every time he uses the word.

Sometimes the lessons we need the most come to us from strange places.

The business world is tough enough. If you are able to jump high enough to get the attention of a decision maker, tenacious enough to get past the gate keeper and brave enough to get yourself in the room for a presentation, do you really want to risk losing all of your credibility by sounding as if you still watch Scooby Doo?

If you have the opportunity to make a presentation in front of one or one hundred, you want nothing to take away from your core message. Besides being grating on the ears, and stripping you of any executive presence that you’ve developed, that’s what filler words do.

Maybe your word isn’t like, but do you have one? How many sentences do you begin with SO? How many sentences do you end with YOU KNOW? These seemingly harmless little words are more than just an annoyance; they’re detrimental to your success.

So, like, if you have like have a problem with your filler words, you should, like think about using the Shaggy’s rubber band trick, you know?

Sometimes the lessons we need the most come to us from strange places, grab it when you see it.

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